"the primary feeling that this world is strange and yet attractive is best expressed in fairy tales...We all owe much sound morality to the penny dreadfuls." - G.K. Chesterton

beatonna:

appendixjournal:

Tips for brain health from 1597 (tip #1: avoid eating “All manner of Braines”).

mmhmm yes yes got to keep that brain chuggin’ 
*eats sage, but not too much*

beatonna:

appendixjournal:

Tips for brain health from 1597 (tip #1: avoid eating “All manner of Braines”).

mmhmm yes yes got to keep that brain chuggin’ 

*eats sage, but not too much*

cmog:

Yellow Amulet Basket by Laura Donefer. Corning Museum of Glass. (via Laura Donefer | Corning Museum of Glass)

cmog:

Yellow Amulet Basket by Laura Donefer. Corning Museum of Glass. (via Laura Donefer | Corning Museum of Glass)

aprilonline:

Big Damn Sampler is done!  Now for a couple of hours at the computer fixing the oopsies in the pattern and a bit of a wash and mount and it will be up on Etsy!  :-D  Phew!  

cmog:

Renaissance Pear by Stephanie Trenchard (Photo by Rachel Ellice Photography). Corning Museum of Glass. (via Stephanie Trenchard | Corning Museum of Glass)

cmog:

Renaissance Pear by Stephanie Trenchard (Photo by Rachel Ellice Photography). Corning Museum of Glass. (via Stephanie Trenchard | Corning Museum of Glass)

erikkwakkel:

Heavenly library

Today I visited the medieval library at Merton College, Oxford as a guest of the Fellow Librarian. It is the UK’s oldest library that was designed to be used by scholars, and it has been functioning as such since its construction in the 1370s. You enter the library at the ground level through a massive door. Going up the stairs you reach the upper floor, where the books are stored. It is sensational to walk among the rows of book cases in the half-lit room. Their shelves are filled with hundreds of early-modern books (many still fitted in their original bindings), which are patiently waiting until someone will touch them again. Heavy benches hoovering over wooden floors are a reminder that this room was once filled with scholars leaning over their books, trying to catch the last light of the day. In the middle of the library a big 13th-century book chest is found, next to a small collection of shiny 14th-century astrolabes. What a heavenly place.

Pics (my own): library, book cases, consultation bench, book chest (13th century), stained-glass window (medieval), and entrance. More information about the library on Merton College’s website (here) and also here; more on Merton College, which dates from the 13th-century, here.

(Source: candle-lighted, via veniasum)

americastestkitchen:

In honor of National Southern Food Day, we’re digging into a decadent breakfast staple: Buttermilk Biscuits topped with spicy sausage Gravy. 

yes now please :o)

americastestkitchen:

In honor of National Southern Food Day, we’re digging into a decadent breakfast staple: Buttermilk Biscuits topped with spicy sausage Gravy. 

yes now please :o)

prairieschoolarchitecture:

Frank Lloyd Wright, Meyer May House, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1908

Rosie and I were just here! It is a beautiful house with kind and accommodating staff, definitely worth a visit :o)  

prairieschoolarchitecture:

Frank Lloyd Wright, Meyer May House, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1908

Rosie and I were just here! It is a beautiful house with kind and accommodating staff, definitely worth a visit :o)  

usnatarchives:

Today marks the 178th anniversary of Charles Ingalls’s birth! A simple farmer born in Cuba, New York, Ingalls would have likely languished in obscurity had not his second-born daughter Laura taken her childhood recollections and parried them into a timeless and award-winning series of children books. 
In this page from a register of homestead receipts from the Dakota Territory we see the line entry for the Ingalls homestead in DeSmet, South Dakota, the family’s final stop in a long series of homes that stretched across present-day Wisconsin, Iowa, Kansas, and Minnesota. Several years after proving up on his claim, Ingalls moved into town where he worked a variety of jobs before passing away in 1902. The DeSmet News ended his obituary with this description: “As a citizen he held high esteem, being honest and upright in his dealings and associations with his fellows. As a friend and neighbor he was always kind and courteous, and a faithful and loving husband and father.” For those fans of the “Little House on the Prairie,” Pa’s DeSmet homestead today is a tourist attraction, still featuring the original cabin Charles Ingalls built for his family over 120 years ago.
The National Archives also holds the papers of Laura Ingalls Wilder and her daughter, Rose Wilder Lane, at the Hoover Presidential Library. (Post originally published on the National Archives at Denver Facebook page. Image source; RG 049 Records of the Bureau of Land Management, Entry 97, “Register of Final Homestead Receipts, December 9, 1871-May 21, 1891,” NARA identifier 7385822)

Happy Birthday Pa!

usnatarchives:

Today marks the 178th anniversary of Charles Ingalls’s birth!

A simple farmer born in Cuba, New York, Ingalls would have likely languished in obscurity had not his second-born daughter Laura taken her childhood recollections and parried them into a timeless and award-winning series of children books.

In this page from a register of homestead receipts from the Dakota Territory we see the line entry for the Ingalls homestead in DeSmet, South Dakota, the family’s final stop in a long series of homes that stretched across present-day Wisconsin, Iowa, Kansas, and Minnesota.

Several years after proving up on his claim, Ingalls moved into town where he worked a variety of jobs before passing away in 1902. The DeSmet News ended his obituary with this description: “As a citizen he held high esteem, being honest and upright in his dealings and associations with his fellows. As a friend and neighbor he was always kind and courteous, and a faithful and loving husband and father.”

For those fans of the “Little House on the Prairie,” Pa’s DeSmet homestead today is a tourist attraction, still featuring the original cabin Charles Ingalls built for his family over 120 years ago.

The National Archives also holds the papers of Laura Ingalls Wilder and her daughter, Rose Wilder Lane, at the Hoover Presidential Library.

(Post originally published on the National Archives at Denver Facebook page. Image source; RG 049 Records of the Bureau of Land Management, Entry 97, “Register of Final Homestead Receipts, December 9, 1871-May 21, 1891,” NARA identifier
7385822)

Happy Birthday Pa!

(via todaysdocument)

yes please