"the primary feeling that this world is strange and yet attractive is best expressed in fairy tales...We all owe much sound morality to the penny dreadfuls." - G.K. Chesterton

homelustdesign:

Girls riding on Sheep by John Drysdale

homelustdesign:

Girls riding on Sheep by John Drysdale

(via pythias)

erikkwakkel:

Wearing a book

Books are objects to read from. This is true now, and so it was in medieval times. Between then and now, however, medieval books were recycled, old-fashioned as they had become after the dawn of printing. These three items show one particular function served by recycled manuscript material: as lining of clothes - and a hat. All three images show linings cut from parchment leaves: the shape of a vest cut from an Icelandic manuscript dating to 1375-1400 (middle); a late-fifteenth century dress of a Cistercian nun in the convent of Wienhausen supported by a 13th-century Latin text (top); and the lining of a bishop’s miter cut from 13th-century Norse love poetry (bottom) - I blogged about the latter here. While the stiff properties of animal skin made it perfect for supporting soft materials such as clothes and hats, it is an odd idea that someone would walk around wearing medieval books - not to mention a bishop preaching with love poetry on his head. On the bright side, thanks to all this recycling, at least parts of these precious books survive. 

Pic: Vest: Arnamagnæan Samling (University of Copenhagen and Stofnun Árna Magnússonar í íslenskum fræðum, Reykjavík), manuscript 122b, fol. II, more information here and here; Dress with manuscript lining: source unknown to me, but featuring in a lecture by Dr. Henrike Lähnemann and discussed in this blog (source of pic); Bishop’s miter: Den Arnamagnæanske Samling, MS AM 666 b 4to, more here.

hehehehe
tragedyseries:

Archive Post #8 Best to know your limits with spices and social interactions

tragedyseries:

Archive Post #8 Best to know your limits with spices and social interactions

erikkwakkel:

houghtonlib:

Boston Type and Stereotype Foundry. The picture alphabet, ca. 1830.

TypTS 870.30.230

Houghton Library, Harvard University

26 cardboard disks, 2 inches in diameter, each with a letter on one side and a picture on the other. In a wooden case.

Not medieval, or even a book, but what a great “bookish” artifact this is!

erikkwakkel:

Medieval costume catalogue

These images are from an unusual kind of manuscript. A booklet, really, with only 23 leaves, made in France around 1500. On the one side of each leaf is a drawing of a man or woman showing off a costume, while on the other side a flower is found - the latter were added later. The whole thing feels like a catalogue for a clothes store. A fancy catalogue, that is, for the clothes are clearly aimed at the upper classes. Some clothes are of eastern origins, like the colourful Arabic costume worn by the lady in the top image. The tiny booklet may have functioned as a model book for decorators, who were shown male and female models in different poses. Unusually, it allows us modern spectators to take a peek in a late medieval street, as it were, where well-dressed individuals are on their way home, to church, or to work.

Pics: Cambridge, Harvard, Houghton Library, MS Typ 220 (c. 1500). More information here and a full facsimile here.

itscolossal:

Kintsugi (or kintsukuroi) is a Japanese method for repairing broken ceramics with a special lacquer mixed with gold, silver, or platinum. The philosophy behind the technique is to recognize the history of the object and to visibly incorporate the repair into the new piece instead of disguising it. The process usually results in something more beautiful than the original.

(Source: kottke.org)

juliannaswaney:

Waiting next to an anxious cat
Watercolor and pencil on paper, 2014
By Julianna Swaney

juliannaswaney:

Waiting next to an anxious cat

Watercolor and pencil on paper, 2014

By Julianna Swaney

“I think we delight to praise what we enjoy because the praise not merely expresses but completes the enjoyment; it is its appointed consummation. It is not out of compliment that lovers keep on telling one another how beautiful they are; the delight is incomplete till it is expressed. It is frustrating to have discovered a new author and not to be able to tell anyone how good he is; to come suddenly, at the turn of the road, upon some mountain valley of unexpected grandeur and then to have to keep silent because the people with you care for it no more than for a tin can in the ditch; to hear a good joke and find no one to share it with.”

—   C.S. Lewis, Reflections on the Psalms (via fragmnts)
beatonna:

appendixjournal:

Tips for brain health from 1597 (tip #1: avoid eating “All manner of Braines”).

mmhmm yes yes got to keep that brain chuggin’ 
*eats sage, but not too much*

beatonna:

appendixjournal:

Tips for brain health from 1597 (tip #1: avoid eating “All manner of Braines”).

mmhmm yes yes got to keep that brain chuggin’ 

*eats sage, but not too much*

cmog:

Yellow Amulet Basket by Laura Donefer. Corning Museum of Glass. (via Laura Donefer | Corning Museum of Glass)

cmog:

Yellow Amulet Basket by Laura Donefer. Corning Museum of Glass. (via Laura Donefer | Corning Museum of Glass)